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Penny Wayne-Shapiro, Violin; Suzuki violin
Founder and Director

Penny Wayne-ShapiroPenny was born in Worthing, southern England, and did her undergraduate and graduate training at the Royal Academy of Music, London, followed by post-graduate work with Ivan Galamian in New York. Later she completed a Master's degree and Doctoral coursework while studying with Yuri Mazurkevich at Boston University, where she also taught string pedagogy in the Music Education department. From 1990-97 she was a faculty member at the Community Music Center of Boston. In 1997 she founded Wayland Violin Studio, which in 2007 expanded to become Wayland School of Music.

Penny's first professional appointment was at age 22, as first violinist with English National Opera. She was also a regular performer with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. She joined the first violin section of the London Philharmonic at age 26, took part in many international tours and recordings, and was featured as costumed soloist in a number of LPO opera productions. She also taught in the LPO educational program, and gave many recitals in London and elsewhere, including a solo tour of Brazil. In the US, Penny was concertmaster (first chair) of the Cape Cod Symphony Orchestra from 2000-2012. She is now the violinist of the Aviva Piano Trio.

A life long learner, Penny continues to be excited about teaching and performing and recently added Suzuki training to her toolbox.

 

Meet Penny:

  1. How/what age did you start your instrument?
    Age nine, but I had been begging for violin lessons for years
  2. Did you come from a musical family?
    My Dad was a concert pianist, but didn't want any of his children to be musicians! (Hence the long wait for lessons.)
  3. Best or funniest (or even worst!) musical memory from childhood?
    When I was ten my Dad gave me his collection of 78 rpm records — four minutes of music per side. I fell hopelessly in love with a particular four minutes of Brahms symphony #1, and played it over and over until the old 78 rpm record player literally went up in smoke.
  4. A highlight or two from your performing career:
    Playing that same piece, Brahms 1, many times (on three continents!) with the London Phil, then several times as concertmaster with the CCSO; a recital tour of the beautiful country of Brazil in the 1980s; the excitement of rehearsing and performing with the Aviva Piano Trio at our recent debut recital in Wayland.
  5. What do you love about teaching?
    Interacting with the kids; seeing the light dawn on their faces as they master something they couldn't do before; sharing my love of a piece of music with them; learning so much myself from teaching them.
  6. What would you like your students to know about you?
    I assume we're going to work hard together, but I’ll do my best to make it fun too - and I will never give up on finding a way to teach you something.
  7. Can you share a non-musical fun fact about you?
    I love waterpark thrill rides! On vacation in New Jersey I went down a 90ft water-slide called the Cliff Dive – it’s rumored that I screamed “really loudly”.
 

Sharon Bielik, Viola and Violin; Suzuki violin/viola

Sharon BielikSharon is a graduate of Brandeis University (BM with highest honors) and Boston University (MM). In addition to WSM, she maintains a private violin/viola studio in Brookline as well as teaching both instruments in the Brookline public schools. Sharon is certified as a Suzuki violin/viola teacher, and is also viola coach for the BU All-University orchestra.

Sharon is assistant principal viola of the Albany Symphony Orchestra, and also plays regularly with the Boston Symphony, Boston Philharmonic and Portland Symphony. She served for three years as principal viola at the Tanglewood Music Center under the direction of James Levine, Sir Andrew Davis, and Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos.

 

Meet Sharon

  1. How/what age did you start your instrument?
    I started on violin at age seven, and then fell in love with viola in high school because of the richness of its sound.
  2. Did you come from a musical family?
    My mother studied piano at Juilliard and my father played French horn professionally, but left the music field for other careers. But they were both very helpful while I was taking lessons.
  3. Best, funniest or worst musical memory from childhood?
    Have to think about this one!
  4. A highlight or two from your performing career:
    A tie between the first time I played with the Boston Symphony (like playing along with a recording!) and getting to travel the world with my youth orchestra in high school. The conductor was a travel agent!
  5. What do you love about teaching?
    Being able to sit back at the recitals and watch months of improvement, hard work and beautiful music. Also, finding tricks to practicing that help students figure out certain “impossible” passages—then it suddenly seems easy!
  6. What would you like your students to know about you?
    Music is so much about the brain and creating new muscle memory, and I will always be an advocate of finding different ways to practice—with the right amount of work nothing should seem impossible.
  7. Can you share a non-musical fun fact about you?
    The only continents I haven't been to are South America and Antarctica.
 

Laura Burgess, Violin/viola; Suzuki violin/viola

Johann SoultsLaura gained her B Mus degree from New England Conservatory and her M Mus degrees from Boston Conservatory, training with Magdalena Richter and Patricia McCarty. Her Suzuki training was with Carol Sykes, Carrie Reuning-Hummel, Teri Einfelt and others.

Laura has taught students age three to adult at Creative Arts in Reading since 1999, and in her private studio. She has also taught group strings, orchestra, and music technology in a number of school systems, including Arlington, Cambridge and Concord-Carlisle.

Laura is a very active chamber music performer as first violinist of the Artisan Chamber Ensemble. As a symphonic musician, she performs with the Plymouth Philharmonic in Massachusetts, and the Johnstown Symphony and Westmoreland Philharmonic in Pennsylvania. She is also the host and producer of the radio show Something about the Women, hosting women’s music shows and providing DJ training.

 

Meet Laura

  1. How/what age did you start your instrument?
    I began viola at age 10 after nagging my parents daily for a year. I added violin a few years later.
  2. Did you come from a musical family?
    Not for a few generations. I learned that my great grandfather played, and I have his violin, but the family piano and cello did not survive the Great Depression.
  3. Best or funniest (or even worst!) musical memory from childhood?
    Probably the funniest moments happened playing trombone with the marching band. Once I lost a shoe marching a muddy football field. Another time my trombone section mates pulled me off the bleachers for fun and my trombone slide flew 30 feet. So much different than orchestra!
  4. A highlight or two from your performing career:
    I loved playing with Johnstown Symphony accompanying Eugene Fodor and Roberta Peters. Even when we didn't have a famous soloist we sold out including standing room. It was a rush to feel the enthusiasm for music coming from the audience.
  5. What do you love about teaching?
    I love sharing music and making it accessible to my students. I love showing people of all ages that they can do it. I love watching them make connections and discoveries.
  6. What would you like your students to know about you?
    I still study and practice and will forever.
  7. Can you share a non-musical fun fact about you?
    I taught my cats to come to a special whistle so they will come home when I call them.
 

Madalyne Cross, Viola/violin; Suzuki violin/viola

Madalyne CrossMadalyne trained at New York University with Stephanie Baer on a Talent Scholarship, and at the Hartt School of Music in CT with Rita Porfiris and Teri Einfeldt, where she completed her MM degree with a specialization in Suzuki pedagogy. Madalyne has taught in a variety of settings, including the Brooklyn Philharmonic Outreach program, the Suzuki Magnet program at Parker Elementary in Houston, Texas, and the Simsbury Arts Academy in CT. Most recently she taught at the Upper Valley Music Center in Lebanon, NH, where she maintained a studio of 35 students aged 4-70 for several years before settling in the Metrowest area in spring 2015.

Madalyne has performed with the One World Symphony and Opera Vista, as well as having extensive freelance experience in CT, NH and VT. She also has a particular interest in chamber music, and has performed as violist with the Cimmaron Ensemble in TX, the 016 New Music Ensemble in CT, and the Saraswati quartet in NH.

 

Meet Madalyne

  1. How/what age did you start your instrument?
    I started playing the violin when I was 5 at the Suzuki Violin program at my elementary school. In 7th grade, I switched to viola as my main instrument.
  2. Did you come from a musical family?
    My father plays the steel guitar and my mother plays the piano.
  3. Best, funniest or worst musical memory from childhood?
    I was playing at a group class Halloween concert dressed as a flamingo, with a pink dress and an inflatable flamingo on my head. We started a piece called "Witches' Dance" and my bow got stuck in the flamingo on my head! (Luckily I was able to get it out quickly and continue playing.)
  4. A highlight or two from your performing career:
    All of the traveling that came with playing in my school orchestras, some neat recording projects in New York and, of course, moonlighting with my Dad's country music band.
  5. What do you love about teaching?
    I love making a connection with a student and watching that student grow and learn to love playing.
  6. What would you like your students to know about you?
    I expect to work hard and to have fun learning together.
  7. Can you share a non-musical fun fact about you?
    I love to cook and to eat!
 

Jill Good, violin/viola; Suzuki violin/viola

Jill GoodJill received her BMus degree from Shenandoah University, VA on a 4 year full scholarship for string quartet playing, and her Masters degree at U Illinois Champaign, where she was also a violin teaching assistant. She is Suzuki certified through book 4.

Jill was the Founder/Director of Ocean Conservatory in Newburyport (1990-97), and the Founder/Director of the Manhattan Violin School (2009-12). She has also taught at the All Newton Music School, the South Shore Conservatory, Indian Hill Art Academy, and Mind-Builders Creative Arts in NY, among others. Jill is the creator of many exciting programs for and with children, including the Peace curriculum for violin students, the Tidewater Arts art-and-nature program, programs for at-risk and low-income children, and popular workshops for teachers.

Jill's performing credits include the Portland Symphony and Rhode Island Symphony, the Boston Academy of Music and others; and extensive freelancing in both Boston and New York City.

 

Meet Jill

    1. How/what age did you start your instrument?
Age 5.
  1. Did you come from a musical family?
    Yes, my father and my grandmother were both professional musicians. Everyone else on the paternal side of my family, although they weren't professional, made music a major part of their lives.
  2. Best, funniest or worst musical memory from childhood?
    My most fun musical memory is singing (and hearing) barbershop quartet music!
  3. A highlight or two from your performing career:
    One of the most moving performance experiences, for me, was playing for the memorial service held at the Worcester Centrum that honored the six firemen who lost their lives in the Worcester Warehouse fire. I've also enjoyed touring with Tony Bennett's orchestra!
  4. What do you love about teaching?
    What I love about teaching is making meaningful relationships with my students so that they not only learn how to play violin, but also learn about how to be in life. For me, almost everything I've learned about being the person I am is rooted in my journey through music. And over the years, more than a few students have told me I've helped them become who they are, which is the biggest compliment I could ever receive!
  5. What would you like your students to know about you?
    I will seldom give you the answer to a challenge or an accomplishment, but I'll always keep guiding you to discover your own answer.
  6. Can you share a non-musical fun fact about you?
    I'm a Mom to two rescue dogs, Seven and Cody! <3
 

Zarina Irkaeva, Cello; Theory/Composition

Zarina IrkaevaZarina trained in Russia, where she won many prizes and awards. She gained her M.Mus degree at the St. Petersburg, Conservatory, and became assistant principal cello of the St. Petersburg State Symphony Orchestra. She began teaching at an early age, and later taught at both the St. Petersburg School for Gifted Children, and the St. Petersburg Rehabilitation Program for Abused Children. She is currently on the cello faculty of Wheaton College.

Zarina performs regularly with the Rhode Island Philharmonic and several other New England orchestras. She is an active chamber musician, and has performed at the Greensboro Music festival in Vermont and the Jewish Music Festival in Boston. She also appears frequently as solo recitalist at various local venues. She is the cellist of the Aviva Piano Trio.

 

Meet Zarina

  1. How/what age did you start your instrument?
    I didn’t start till nine years old, because they all (family and teachers) wanted me to be physicist or mathematician instead.
  2. Did you come from a musical family?
    Yes, Mother, Aunt, Uncle and another five members of the family
  3. Best, funniest or worst musical memory from childhood?
    Before I was finally allowed to take lessons, I found two rulers in my house and used them as an imaginary violin and bow to practice hand positions – that was the best I could do, my uncle’s wife would have been furious with me if I’d touched her real one!
  4. A highlight or two from your performing career:
    I am not sure I have an answer to this one! It would be very difficult to find just one episode, it would take a whole book to fit them. I love learning – I was so lucky to meet many of teachers I had – they are highlights to my career – F. Reznikov, K. Kucherov, E. Fishman, A. Paulavichus, N. Nuridjanian, K. Tatebe, L. Jeppessen and a long list of others. I love to experiment myself and learn from my music partners. Everyone brings new perspective on things.
  5. What do you love about teaching?
    I love children. I love kids’ world. I love when someone walks in not knowing how to open the instrument case and a couple of years later is debating the best concept of performing Bach.
  6. What would you like your students to know about you?
    Do not be fooled by my soft voice and smile, I am kind but I am strict too!
  7. Can you share a non-musical fun fact about you?
    I love history. I love decorating, potion making, designing my own clothing (if I would only have a time for all of that!).
 

Stephen James, Piano; Theory and Composition

Stephen JamesStephen is a graduate of Amherst College (BA summa com laude) and Boston University (MM & DMA), where he majored in both piano and composition and was a member of Phi Kappa Lambda National Music Honor Society. He has maintained a private piano studio for many years, and has been Professor of Piano at Worcester State University since 1997. He has also taught at Boston University, UMass Dartmouth, Bridgewater State College and Brookline Music School.

Stephen is a very active concert performer of both standard and 20th/21st century repertoire, who has appeared at Tanglewood, Mechanics Hall Worcester, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, many area colleges and a variety of other venues. He is also a prolific and award-winning composer whose works have been performed by ensembles such as the Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra, the Atlantic Brass Quintet and the Boston String Quartet; and heard on WGBH, WBUR and other radio stations.

 

Meet Stephen

  1. How/what age did you start your instrument?
    Eight years old.
  2. Did you come from a musical family?
    My mother played piano and my father french horn and trombone, but neither of them played much by the time I came along. But my mom, in particular, did like classical music.
  3. Best, funniest or worst musical memory from childhood?
    I don't remember exactly how old I was, probably in junior high, when I played my first Chopin Polonaise - it was a bit flashy, and I was very excited, because I had a recording of the great Artur Rubinstein playing the same piece. I was sure I would sound exactly like him, but, surprise! - our performances sounded nothing alike! I was astounded - we were playing the same notes - how could we sound so different? Well, many years and much study later, I have a few ideas!
  4. A highlight or two from your performing career:
    I've had a chance to play with some wonderful singers and instrumentalists over the years: one was baritone Sanford Sylvan, who commissioned a set of songs from me which we performed. He had it all: rhythmic and pitch precision, musicality, passion - that was a wonderful experience.
  5. What do you love about teaching?
    I love kids in general - up to and including college kids - and feel adults have more to learn from young people than we think. So for me teaching is a chance to help these amazing creatures learn about music, but also to learn from their openness and creativity.
  6. What would you like your students to know about you?
    Piano lessons do involve effort, but they can and should be enjoyable for the student. I am in the business of solving problems. Most students are not "naturals", yet many are musical and some are very talented: for me good teaching is about helping every student to discover how to make playing effortless. Real facility comes from mastering the basics, but piano teaching can also benefit greatly from modern insights into learning and relaxation - and most of all from a positive relationship with the teacher.
  7. Can you share a non-musical fun fact about you?
    I just recently started doing Tai Chi - it's wonderful, but there are sorts of balance moves where you have to stand on one leg while doing various other things. Sadly, I have a tendency to fall over - it's strange being a beginner again.
 

Sheryl Lafayette, Piano; Suzuki Piano

Sheryl Lafayette Sheryl received her BMus (honors) and Masters degrees from U Madison-Wisconsin, studying with Jeanette Ross and Tait Sanford. She followed with extensive post-grad study in Suzuki philosophy and pedagogy, studying with Doris Harrell, Mary Craig Powell and Valery Lloyd-Watts. She is registered as a Suzuki instructor through level 4 piano.

Sheryl is happy to use a Suzuki, traditional, or combination approach, depending on the needs of the student. As well as maintaining her extensive private studio, she is piano instructor at Creative Arts in Reading, and was its Director from 2004-2009. She is a past Director of the MA Suzuki Association and the MA Suzuki Festival, and since 2005 has been Assistant Director of the Suzuki-by-the-Green summer piano workshop. She is also an adjudicator for the Eastern District Junior and Senior Festivals, and for the Rivers Conservatory Youth Orchestras.

As a performer, Sheryl freelances extensively with chamber groups in the Metro Boston area, and also performs (as violinist) with the Merrimack Valley Philharmonic, the North Shore Philharmonic, and the Massachusetts Symphony Orchestra.

 

Meet Sheryl

  1. How/what age did you start your instrument?
    I remember wanting to play the piano as a tiny child but there was no way to get a piano into our second floor, three room apartment. At age 10, I was able to start on the cello in our public school program, and later violin. I played piano whenever possible and taught myself a lot, but did not have formal piano lessons until college.
  2. Did you come from a musical family?
    No. My dad had no musical experience; my mom had some piano lessons as a child. I found out later that my maternal grandfather wrote popular songs (I still have some of them) and made instruments (violins and mandolins). He claimed he had a dream in which “Old Man Stradivarius” came to him and told him the secret of how he made his beautiful violins, but he never revealed that secret to me!
  3. Best, funniest or worst musical memory from childhood?
    Once, in junior high school, I somehow broke the scroll and fingerboard off my cello. I remember walking home with about five friends, each of us carrying a piece of the cello. It was VERY humiliating.
  4. A highlight or two from your performing career:
    Performing in a group of teachers led by Shinichi Suzuki. I’ve had many experiences where I feel as one with the music and the musicians around me; Dr. Suzuki was a master at helping us to feel the living soul of tone.
  5. What do you love about teaching?
    I love making connections with students (each one is different!), and helping them making connections with music. I love showing them how to play mindfully yet relaxed, using their entire body.
  6. What would you like your students to know about you?
    I consider myself a musician rather than as a specific instrumentalist. I look upon performing as a way of communicating through one’s instrument. I think it is possible to have very high standards and also make learning music fun. I want students to look for their own answers as much as they can rather than having me tell them exactly what to do.
  7. Can you share a non-musical fun fact about you?
    I live with a beautiful black cat named Minerva who refused to come out from under the bed for the first five months she lived with me, but is now starting to venture forth.
 

Eamonn O'Hara, Piano

Eamonn O'HaraEamonn O'Hara was a scholarship student at both the New England Conservatory Prep School and the Boston Conservatory. His principal teachers were with Jonathan Bass, Ramon River and Hilda Shapiro, and he also took masterclasses with the legendary Leon Fleischer.

Eamonn teaches at the Amadeus Music School in Lexington; he has previously taught piano at LexiMusic, and pedagogy at the Boston Arts Academy. He brings to his students not only his extensive teaching and performing experience but also his in-depth study of the Alexander Technique, in order to help them employ natural and effective movement in developing their piano playing.

Eamonn is a versatile performer who has appeared as soloist and chamber musician at a wide range of venues in New England, and has also performed as symphonic pianist with the Cape Ann and Melrose Symphony Orchestras.

 

Meet Eamonn

  1. How/what age did you start your instrument?
    I was seven when formal lessons began. My mother, an avid player herself, naturally showed me some things at the piano before then.
  2. Did you come from a musical family?
    My mother is a Classical enthusiast and loves the piano. My father plays guitar and enjoys a wide mix of music, mostly Celtic and folk. Our house was always filled with music.
  3. Best, funniest or worst musical memory from childhood?
    Back in high school, I was supposedly offered to play for a concert at Ozawa Hall, Tanglewood. Of course, I had heard people say nice things about my playing before, but this was simply astonishing! I set to feverish preparation for the event, but soon learned they only needed me as an usher and to hand out programs. Quite a disappointment at the time, but very funny in retrospect!
  4. A highlight or two from your performing career:
    An invitation from my former teacher, Hilda Banks Shapiro, to play Schubert's Wanderer Fantasy at Searles Castle in Stockbridge. I had six weeks to learn the finger-breakingly difficult 20-minute work, and gave perhaps my best performance ever up until that time. The castle environs certainly helped kick on the epic dimension.
  5. What do you love about teaching?
    Seeing a student light up as they listen to and engage with music. To give them access to the world of music is the most wonderful privilege!
  6. What would you like your students to know about you?
    It's an absolute joy to discover music with my students. Although progress is always exciting, I understand that our journey has its fair share of challenges and charms, plateaus and breakthroughs. As long as we maintain an attitude of earnest learning, curiosity and awe, we will play our best and inevitably be nourished by music.
  7. Can you share a non-musical fun fact about you?
    Before music became my passion, I enjoyed drawing and thought at one time I would go into art. I still like doodling in all my notebooks.
 

Johann Soults, Cello

Johann SoultsJohann studied at the Oberlin School of Music, where he obtained his Bachelor of Music degree, and subsequently did postgraduate cello study with George Neikrug and Terry King. He is much in demand as a teacher, maintaining studios in Dartmouth, Bedford, and Franklin in addition to his extensive private practice in Boston. He is also a judge for the NE regional district auditions.

Johann is principal cellist of the Claflin Hill Symphony and former principal cellist of the Utica (NY) Symphony. He is a very active chamber musician and member of Ensemble Porte ño, with whom he has appeared live on WGBH. His recording credits also include live jazz recordings with artists such as Ida Zecco, Carol O’Shaughnessy, Silvia Greenberg and Jan Peters.

 

Meet Johann

  1. How/what age did you start your instrument?
    nine years old
  2. Did you come from a musical family?
    Absolutely not!
  3. Best or funniest (or even worst!) musical memory from childhood?
    Slipping on the ice and breaking the neck of my cello trying to catch the bus. I'm still in therapy for it…
  4. A highlight or two from your performing career:
    Playing on WBGH live. It was by far the best group experience, the best overall experience, and yet most nerve-racking performance I’ve played.
  5. What do you love about teaching?
    Seeing my students progress over time.
  6. What would you like your students to know about you?
    I'm very serious about music and the cello, but not about anything else!
  7. Can you share a non-musical fun fact about you?
    In spite of my name I am not German, I was born and raised in upstate NY by completely American parents – one North American, the other South American. Everyone else in my family has a perfectly normal English and pronounceable name, except for my mom's side—they all have beautiful Spanish names.
 

Irving Steinberg, Bass

Irving SteinbergIrving Steinberg is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley (BM) and Boston University (MM). Twice a fellow at the Tanglewood Music Center, he has also participated in the Spoleto Festival USA, Hot Springs Music Festival, Festival Dei Due Mondi, Spoleto, Aspen Music Festival, and the Hidden Valley Music Camp.

Teaching has been part of his life since he was in high school, and he has taught students from elementary to college level. He has been coach of the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra, the Boston University Tanglewood Institute Bass Seminar, Spencer Brook Strings, New England Conservatory, and NEC Festival Youth Orchestra.

In addition to teaching, Mr. Steinberg is currently a freelance musician in the Greater Boston and New England region and has performed with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Boston Pops Orchestra, Chamber Orchestra of Boston, Boston Ballet, Boston Lyric Opera, Orchestra of Indian Hill, Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra, and Rhode Island Philharmonic, to name a few. His teachers include Charles Siani, Brian Marcus, Edwin Barker, George Neikrug, Todd Seeber, and Jim Orleans.

 

Meet Irving

  1. How/what age did you start your instrument?
    I started bass in the 5th grade, age ten
  2. Did you come from a musical family?
    My parents and siblings all played piano and my oldest brother played guitar and has a great voice, but I was the only one to really get so deeply into it.
  3. Best or funniest (or even worst!) musical memory from childhood?
    The funniest and worst musical memory of mine was getting sent out of string orchestra rehearsal in the 5th grade for yawning. The director saw me yawn and asked me if I was tired. Not wanting to look as though I was not alert and attentive I said no, implying that I was bored. Last time I ever did that!
  4. A highlight or two from your performing career:
    Performing the Star Wars soundtrack with the Boston Pops and the composer John Williams conducting a few years ago; this had been a goal of mine since I saw the movie in 1977—the same year I started playing.
  5. What do you love about teaching?
    Being able to introduce musical concepts to a young player for the first time. Even if the concept is old as the hills for me, it becomes new and exciting for me again through the student.
  6. What would you like your students to know about you?
    I love all styles of music.
  7. Can you tell us a non–musical fun fact about you?
    I once drove cross country by myself in 78 hours.